Los Sures


DIRECTOR: Diego Echeverria

WILLIAMSBURG’S SOUTHSIDE

RUNTIME: 57 MIN

GENRE: Documentary

sunday, May 5th 2019

PROGRAM IIi, 5:00PM

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SYNOPSIS: In the late 70s and early 80s, Los Sures was one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York City. In fact, it had been called the worst ghetto in America. Diego Echeverria’s film skillfully represents the challenges of its time: drugs, gang violence, crime, abandoned real estate, racial tension, single-parent homes, and inadequate local resources. The complex portrait also celebrates the vitality of this largely Puerto Rican and Dominican community, showing the strength of their culture, their creativity, and their determination to overcome a desperate situation. Beautifully restored just in time for the 30th anniversary of the premiere at the New York Festival, this documentary is a priceless piece of New York City history.



Blue Reverie


DIRECTOR: Siting Yang

best Experimental Short

RUNTIME: 20 MIN

GENRE: EXperimental

friday, May 3rd 2019

PROGRAM I, 7:00PM

Tickets

LOGLINE: A woman’s two inner selves recognize each other for the first time.

SYNOPSIS: Striving to create an online persona with the hope of approaching wealthy men to fund her project, a young woman struggles with the thought of sacrificing dignity for the sake of her artistic vision. As the persona takes on a life of its own, gradually shifting her focus and purpose, two inner selves recognize each other for the first time in turmoil.



The Washing Society


DIRECTOR: Lynne Sachs & Lizzie Olesker

Experimental Short

RUNTIME: 44 MIN

GENRE: Experimental

Friday, May 3rd 2019

PROGRAM I, 7:00PM

Tickets

LOGLINE: From class and race to women’s history and gentrification, filmmaker Lynne Sachs and playwright Lizzie Olesker craft an intimate sociohistorical portrait of an urban laundromat using the people who worked there for decades.

SYNOPSIS: In the 21st century, the laundromat has become a symbol of the aging urban community, one of its last units to disappear as gentrification fleshes its roots out across the neighborhood. The people who have been working there for as long as several decades are almost as invisible, perhaps only recognizable by paper-thin button-up vests or pouches stuffed with quarters. Interviewing and creating performances with several of these individuals, filmmaker Lynne Sachs and playwright Lizzie Olesker craft an intimate sociohistorical portrait of this former staple of urban life. While touching on issues of social class, race, and women’s history, Sachs and Olesker’s documentary avoids exposé to prioritize giving visibility to the people that are the lifeblood of this all-too familiar yet fading institution.