Recommended Screenings for the Greenpoint Film Festival (3/17 – 3/20)

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Recommended Screenings for the Greenpoint Film Festival (3/17 – 3/20)
Posted by Peter Y. | March 16, 2016

Can Video Bring Us Our (Missing) Park?The Greenpoint Film Festivalstarts tomorrow, and here is our shortlist of recommended movies for you.

The promise of a park in Bushwick Inlet has intrigued Greenpoint residents for a long time. So it is appropriate that festivities begin on Thursday (3/17) at 8 pm with Can Video Bring Us Our (Missing) Park, a presentation of  video footage with a live discussion about our ongoing struggle.

Moving to another property-related topic, do you think the housing market in Greenpoint is getting outlandish? Keep in mind that one of the nice things about our neighborhood is it still has a ton of houses where the owner rents out an entire ground floor. So you can still be young and fun and not paid very well, and as long as you are willing to live with other people, you can have a nice backyard and the spiritual warmth of a real house.

For the opposite circumstance, watch Superjednostka on Friday night (3/18). This documentary reveals life inside a “SuperUnit,” a housing complex that can hold 3,000 people on its 15 floors. The elevators only stop every three floors so residents have to navigate a maze of hallways and stairs to get to their apartments. Here’s the trailer.

Actually, that makes living there look kind of fun, like being in The Shining. And since it’s filmed in Poland, it will give you something to chat about with our local community.

Becoming BulletproofFor Saturday (3/19), I like the thematic promise of Becoming Bulletproof, a documentary about a troupe of differently abled kids who put on a costume Western.

My uncle’s friend runs a similar program, where he uses theater to help struggling kids focus and work as a team, and also to spur their imagination. It is really heartening to see the joy it brings them.

And many famous actors say that what pulled them into acting was being able to escape from cruelties faced in the real world by getting to “be” someone else for a while. Historically, one way this functioned was to provide an escape from mid-century anti-gay prejudice.
JunoFor Sunday (3/20) I recommend a series of Brooklyn-related shorts starting at 5:30 pm. It includes Juno, about the beautiful winter storm we had that brought Greenpoint to a standstill. Filmmaker Jeffrey Enkler assembles a three-minute tour of eerily empty streets set to original music from composer Jamin Winans.

Another short in Sunday’s program, Greenpoint 2016, delves into the history of Greenpoint and Newton Creek environmental problems and remediation proposals.

Tickets for the festival are quite reasonably priced at $10 a show. Day passes are $18, and a full festival pass is $56. Tickets and passes can be purchased here.

Click on the movie links above for specific show times and locations.

Original article.

“The Cycle” Wins at Greenpoint Film Festival

Nutmeg
March 10, 2016

Congrats to Sound Designer/Mixer Steve Perski and Graphics and VFX Director Stephen C. Walsh for their contributions to “The Cycle,” winner for Best Narrative Short in the Greenpoint Film Festival. Directed by Michael Marantz, the 11-minute dramatic short explores the gut-wrenching ramifications of gun violence and the bottomless emotional abyss between sense and senseless, defense and defenseless.

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Winners: Steve Perski and Stephen C. Walsh

 
“The goal of the film,” according to producers at Already Alive, “is to tell an emotionally powerful story to instigate genuine conversation around the issue of fear and how it contributes to violence in our communities.” Watch the trailer below. To request a copy of the film or to contact the filmmakers for help organizing a screening, visit the film’s website, The Cycle Film.

Original post.

Activism and the Environment Spotlighted at Greenpoint Film Festival

DNAinfo
March 7, 2016

By Gwynne Hogan | March 7, 2016 4:36pm

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GREENPOINT — Coming up next week, the fifth annual Greenpoint Film Festival will tackle pollution in local waterways and community activism, alongside international works.

Narrative, documentary, environmental and experimental shorts and features will screen at the Wythe Hotel from March 17 to 20 along with panel discussions.

Local activists with Friends of Bushwick Inlet Park who are pushing the city to fulfill its promise of a 27-acre waterfront park will be featured on the festival’s opening night March 17 in a series of shorts documenting their activism over the past year, followed by a panel discussion.

Other shorts like “Greenpoint 2016” screening on March 20, will highlight environmental issues in Greenpoint and Newtown Creek and explore possible remedies.

While the surrounding neighborhood plays a role in some of the films on the screen, others hail from different parts of the country and the world.

Take “Becoming Bulletproof,” a feature-length documentary that captures a behind-the-scenes look at the filming of a Western flick which stars many actors with disabilities.

While “Roman Citizen,” an Italian feature, blends thriller and mystery.

The festival takes place at the Wythe Hotel at 80 Wythe Ave. Individual screenings cost $10, day passes are $18 and full festival passes for four days of films cost $56. Visit the website for more information.

Original post.

Get movie-ing! Activists hope new film will force city to act on Bushwick Inlet Park

Occupy the Inlet

Brooklyn Paper
March 7, 2016

BY ALLEGRA HOBBS

Lights, camera, activism!

A group of Greenpoint protesters who have been badgering the city to build a waterfront park it promised a decade ago will screen the greatest hits of their open-space activism at a local film festival — and the activists believe the creative display is the best way to reel in the mayor’s attention.

“I think video is the best way to get the mayor to act,” said Dewey Thompson of the Friends of Bushwick Inlet Park, which will air its protest videos at the Greenpoint Film Festival on March 17. “It’s a way of creatively, persistently, pursuing the issue.”

The screening at Williamsburg’s snazzy Wythe Hotel will feature 10 short protest videos the group made throughout the last year in an effort to get the city to snatch up the remaining waterfront lot and turn it into community green space.

The short films will scroll chronologically through the group’s past year of activism — one clip includes an aerial shot of local athletes and prospective park-goers form a huge question mark on the existing turf, while another shows protestors paddling into the inlet in a swarm of kayaks for a water-born demonstration.

Several of the movies use drone footage to capture the sadly un-purchased land from a bird’s-eye view — giving the disgruntled community its first and only look at the hostage plot of land, said Thompson.

“It’s all behind fences, privately owned and cut off from the community,” he said. “The drone footage was a revelation to us.”

The city promised to build a 28-acre park between the East River and Kent Avenue, stretching from N. Ninth Street and Meserole Avenue, to sweeten a massive 2005 rezoning that has allowed developers to build high-rise residences along the waterfront.

Since then luxury sky-scrapers have popped up, packing in thousands of new residents along the overcrowded coast, but the city has so far only purchased 17 acres of the pledged land, and has turned only seven acres of that space into parkland.

The group will show all the protest videos in one go to demonstrate the power of filmmaking as an activist tool — and while the year’s worth of footage has yet to convince Mayor DeBlasio to make a move, Thompson remains optimistic that the camera-carting antics are essential to remaining a thorn in the mayor’s side.

“Is it going to be enough to push DeBlasio to make the enormous commitment to acquire the park?” It hasn’t happened yet,” said Thompson. “But this raises community awareness and lets DeBlasio know we are not going away.” “Can Video Bring Us Our Missing Park?” at the Greenpoint Film Festival at the Wythe Hotel [80 Wythe Avenue between N. 11th and N. 12th Streets, (718) 460–8000, www.greenpointfilmfestival.org]. March 17 at 8 pm. $10.

Reach reporter Allegra Hobbs at ahobbs@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–8312.
Photo by Stefano Giovannini

Greenpoint Star: Greenpoint Film Festival returns this weekend

Sep 16, 2014 by Andrew Shilling

The Greenpoint Film Festival is back with a whole new lineup of local and international films, ranging from experimental and avant-garde to environmentally focused documentaries, as well as animated films and shorts.

Opening night is Thursday, September 18, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at the Wythe Hotel, 80 Wythe Ave., a day festival founder Rosa Valado said manages to creep up just a little quicker every year.

“It’s a very exciting composite of films we’re putting together,” Valado said in anticipation of the fourth annual film festival. “We have films from Australia, France and one from Japan, but a bulk of them are from here in the community.”

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Greenpoint Gazette: Greenpoint Film Fest Returns, Raising Environmental Awareness in the Nabe

Sep 10, 2014 by Tanay Warerkar

GFF 2014 in the Greenpoint Gazette
The Wythe Hotel will once again play host to the Greenpoint Film Festival, which this year highlights the best-in themes of renewal and reclamation and how to creatively address the needs of a neighborhood considered one of the most polluted in the country.

For four days next week, the festival will showcase films shortlisted by a panel of six judges who chose from over 200 entries to this year’s festival.

Films were submitted in four categories namely Narrative, Documentary, Experimental, and Animation.

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Greenpointers: The 2013 Greenpoint Film Festival: From Music to Micro-Budget

Sep 30, 2013 by Drew E

This past weekend, the Greenpoint Film Festival returned to the neighborhood for it’s third consecutive year, pulling from many different facets of the film world.The highlights included selections from the world of documentary, music video, new for 2013, and the world of the Micro-Budget film.


Music Video Artist Panel – © Erin Lee

Last Friday evening’s documentary portion, housed at 67 West Street, featured Max Kutner’s, “At The Corner of 3rd and 3rd”, a short-form piece showcasing Gowanus’ own Coignet Stone Company Building; a 19th century historic holdout in the ever-developing landscape of Brooklyn. This was followed by Lisa Molomot’s feature length, “The Hill” which focuses on a New Haven, CT neighborhood dealing with the looming displacement of it’s residents due to expansion of the city’s school system. Both films offered plenty of food for thought and I found that Kutner’s Gowanus piece struck closer to home as we here, in Greenpoint, are also dealing with the prospects of urban renewal and development and the impact that is having on our community.

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WG: Greenpoint Film Festival 2013 Wrap Up

Sep 24, 2013 by Keith R. Higgons

After a successful opening night on Thursday, September 19, the third annual Greenpoint Film Festival wrapped on Sunday. Just as she has done in the previous two years, Festival Director Rosa Valado was able to tap into the creativity of our neighborhood as well as bring together a diverse group of films and filmmakers from around the world. In addition to screening a number of amazing films, the Greenpoint Film Festival played host to a number of spirited discussions and panels.

The festival had the prerequisite narrative and documentary categories in addition to highlighting micro-budget/DIY films, experimental films, and offered a music video screening and discussion. The closing day, Sunday, featured an extensive environmental film and discussion series in addition to animated and performance films.

In short, the Greenpoint Film Festival delivered a broad selection of films and discussions that provided something for all the varying interests in our nabe.

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Time Out: See shorts about Brooklyn at the Greenpoint Film Festival

The three-year-old fest returns to North Brooklyn for four days’ worth of screenings at venues around the neighborhood.

Sep 17, 2013 By Peter Kirby

The annual New York Film Festival gets underway on September 27, but if you’re looking for something that’s more hyperlocal, consider checking out the Greenpoint Film Festival. The upstart event, now in its third year, returns to Brooklyn from September 19 through 23. Though it has maintained its traditional focus on the environment—this year’s schedule includes a group of shorts about waterways—the schedule also features a diverse roster of narrative films, documentaries, experimental shorts and animated flicks.

A few highlights of next week’s program: a documentary short about the iconic Coignet Stone Company Building in Gowanus (“At the Corner of 3rd and 3rd”); an animation about a nuclear-weapons engineer who finds love (“The Pyrotechnician’s Daughter”); and “The Sleepy Man,” a short featuring the great John Hawkes as well as a (very) sleepy man.

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Greenpoint Star: 2013 Greenpoint Film Festival is back

Sept 18, 2013 by Andrew Shilling

The Greenpoint Film Festival is back again for the third year in North Brooklyn, and this year there were more submissions than ever before.

According to founder Rosa Valado, the response this year brought in nearly double the submissions from last year, with 200 shorts, documentaries, experimental and animated films. The first year of the festival saw just 75 submissions.

“We got more than twice the films than we did last year,” Valado said.

Judges this year included Jeremy Kipp Walker, director and producer for the New York-based Journeyman Pictures; playwright, short film maker and Greenpoint film enthusiast Keith R. Higgons; Michael Sayers, owner of Photoplay Video and DVD; Brooklyn filmmaker Rachael Guma; and artist and filmmaker Tom Jarmusch.

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Greenpoint Gazette: Greenpoint Film Festival Returns Next Week

Sep 13, 2013 by Kevin D’Angelo

The Greenpoint Film Festival is back for its third year, running from September 19th to the 22nd. The festival, which in the past featured a retrospective of David Lynch and a premiere of Jonas Mekas’ My Mars Bar Movie, will screen an exciting collection of films at venues including West Street Studios and The Gutter Bowling Alley on North 14th Street.

Since its first year in 2011, the festival has grown from a simple collection of films and video art pieces to a dynamic festival of documentaries, feature length narratives, shorts, animation and experimental pieces mixed with various curated programs.

Visual artist and founder of the festival, Rosa Valado, founded the festival as a platform to bring visual ideas and a variety of voices to the North Brooklyn community. A resident of more than 20 years, Rosa felt compelled to launch a film festival in a neighborhood as culturally vibrant as Greenpoint.
“Here we are with one of the biggest art and film communities in New York” she said. “I thought it had to happen.”

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Bedford + Bowery: Is the Greenpoint Film Festival Back? Dolphinately!

August 20, 2013 By Erica Martin

A pyrotechnics addict in love, a moody French-Canadian out to save a Palestinian refugee, and a trailblazing dolphin. They’ll all hit the big screen at the third annual Greenpoint Film Festival next month.

Woven Spaces, a Greenpoint-based arts organization that has been working out of Brooklyn since 1996, will screen four days worth of animations, docs, narratives, and experimental films at venues around the neighborhood, including the Greenpoint Boathouse.

The festival’s first year, in 2011, saw the premiere of Jonas Mekas’s Mars Bar movie. This year, feature films include a French-Canadian drama titled La Vallée Des Larmes (Valley of Tears) and The Pyrotechnician’s Daughter, an animated love story about “a nuclear weapon engineer with a taste for pyrotechnics.”

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Greenpoint Gazette: Greenpoint Film Festival Closes with a Positive Sign

Jeff Mann
Douglas Ridloff by Jeff Mann

 

Sep 28, 2012 by Jeff Mann

With a silent tribute that spoke volumes, the Greenpoint Film Festival (GFF) closed on Sunday, September 23rd, with a tip of its hat to Best Documentary winner “Deaf Jam.”

The film follows Aneta Brodski, a deaf teen, who when introduced to American Sign Language (ASL) poetry, enters the spoken word slam scene. In an interesting twist, Brodski, an Israeli immigrant, meets Tahani, a hearing Palestinian slam poet and the two collaborate on a performance duet, creating a new form of slam poetry that speaks to both the hearing and the deaf.

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ASL Slam on Closing Night

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Greenpoint Gazette: Eclecticism Highlights the 2nd Annual Greenpoint Film Festival

Eclecticism Highlights the 2nd Annual Greenpoint Film Festival

Sep 20, 2012 by Nick Powell

After a successful inaugural year, the Greenpoint Film Festival makes its return to the neighborhood this week, showcasing talented young filmmakers and actors and providing local cinephiles the opportunity to view interesting and dynamic films in their own backyard.

More than 25 films will be screened at the four-day event, which runs from Thursday, September 20th through Sunday, September 23rd at multiple locations throughout Greenpoint. The films were selected by eight judges from a field of over 100 submissions in categories such as Documentary, Narrative, and Experimental.

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Greenpointers: Greenpoint Film Festival Day 3: Community, Environment and Tom Jarmusch

Posted by Matt G. |

 

In what was an inspired choice of venue, day three of the Greenpoint Film Festival took place at the Newtown Creek Visitors Center with a selection of environmentally and community themed documentaries. Opening the program was the must-see “The Domino Effect” – a very timely chronicle of the ongoing saga of the former sugar plant along the Williamsburg waterfront which was part of the city’s planned rezoning efforts to turn the facility into luxury and “affordable” housing.

 


Assemblyman Joe Lentol speaks at the Q&A following the screening for “The Domino Effect” at the Greenpoint Film Festival (photo by M. Glasson)

 

In the informal Q&A afterwards, co-producer Brian Paul said that the building has switched from its previous owner and is now back on the market.  Greenpoint assemblyman Joe Lentol was also in attendance, and was able to shed light on some of the latest developments of the complex.

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Greenpointers: Greenpoint Film Festival Day Two: The Millennium Nomadic Program

 

On Friday, the Millennium Film Workshop, an artists’ film collaborative based out of the East Village, guest-curated the Greenpoint Film Festival’s program with a host of bold and striking experimental short films under the banner of the “Millennium Nomadic Program.” I’m of the opinion that any attempts to describe experimental shorts kind of defeats the purpose of their existence: they exist outside the conventions that we come to expect from short-form content in order that they challenge the aesthetic experience of the viewer and yesterday’s works were no exception.

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Greenpointers: Opening Night of The Greenpoint Film Festival

Opening Night of The Greenpoint Film Festival

 

Last night was the opening night celebration of The Greenpoint Film Festival which took place at the Greenpoint Garage on Huron Street off of Manhattan Ave. The festival kicked off with a standing-room only screening of the documentary “Deaf Jam” about a deaf girl (Aneta Brodski) who gets involved with performing ASL poetry in her high school. It was a highly effective film in exploring and giving a voice to those who are stripped of their basic sense of hearing and their struggles to find their own voice through performing signed poetry.

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Greenpoint Star: Rosa Valado

by Heather Senison

Mar 20, 2012

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Rosa Valado moved to Richmond Hill from a small town in Northwest Spain with her parents when she was 11 years old.

She went back to Europe several years later to study art in Madrid, finishing with a specialized degree in Fine Arts and Art History from CUNY Queens College.

As the years went on, Valado moved to Brooklyn, where she’s lived in Williamsburg and Greenpoint since.

“I love the community,” she said of Greenpoint. “I think geographically it’s just really beautiful.”

Greenpoint Star: Greenpoint film fest taking submissions

Attendees in 2011, photo compliments of the Greenpoint Film Festival.

Attendees in 2011, photo compliments of the Greenpoint Film Festival.
 

The Greenpoint Film Festival is gearing up for its second year, taking submissions from the public, in addition to curated programs, for the first time.

Categories for the festival, hosted by Brooklyn’s Woven Spaces arts organization, include experimental/avant-garde, narrative, documentary, and animation. The festival is also accepting features, shorts and some student works.

A jury of roughly 10 people will vote on films to select for the festival, according to Director Rosa Valado.

“Everything will be seen, everything will be looked at,” she said of the submissions.

New York Times: Jonas Mekas on His Mars Bar Movie

Last night, just a couple dozen people braved the rain and cold to help kick off the first Greenpoint Film Festival with the premiere of Jonas Mekas’s new documentary, “My Mars Bar Movie.” The film, which Mr. Mekas, 88, said he had recorded during trips to Mars Bar over the course of fifteen years at Anthology Film Archives across the street, begins with a close-up of the archivist and filmmaker’s first name carved in the bar, followed by admiring shots of an insect-ridden fly strip and then the first of countless clinking tequila glasses.

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Rooftop Films: The First Annual Greenpoint Film Festival

Yesterday evening marked the beginning of what appears to be a promising new presence on the New York film scene: the opening night of the first annual Greenpoint Film Festival,  launched by Brooklyn based arts organization Woven Spaces.

Films screened for the rest of the weekend will be a promising melange of documentaries, features and shorts with experimental tendencies, as well a good helping of repertory programming. The festival takes places at the Broadway Stages studio this weekend at 222 West St, which offers views of Manhattan and the East River in a loft-style screening space. The venue also happens to be beneath one of Brooklyn’s first rooftop farms, Eagle Street Rooftop Farm (and you know how we feel about Rooftops). Festival programmer and photographer Scott Nyerges spent 2010 documenting the farm’s growing season, so it comes as little surprise that they have chosen regeneration as the program’s organizing theme.

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Greenpoint Gazette: First Annual Greenpoint Film Festival Kicks Off this Weekend

On October 27th, the Greenpoint Film Festival will make its debut. Inside Broadway Stages, movies from avant-garde, indie filmmakers will be screened, as will the work of cult favorite David Lynch. Throughout the four-day event, a wide variety of films with diverse themes covering environmental issues, local happenings, and social commentary are going to be shown.

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Brooklyn Paper: Mekas movies: Film legend premieres a doc at film fest this weekend

Legendary filmmaker and Gotham flaneur Jonas Mekas is set to kick off the first-ever Greenpoint Film Festival with the premiere of a full-length documentary about boozing it up at the infamous Mars Bar in Manhattan.

The 88-year-old, Lithuanian-born and Brooklyn-based filmmaker nicknamed “the Godfather of avant-garde cinema,” will screen five of his films at the Greenpoint Film Festival — Oct. 27–30 at Broadway Stages in Greenpoint — including his brand new “My Mars Bar Movie,” an homage — and love letter — to the iconic Manhattan dive that recently closed.

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Greenpoint Star: Jonas Mekas: The acclaimed filmmaker still remains a “local boy”

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Well-known for his contribution to the avant-garde film world, Jonas Mekas has been called the godfather of it all, but the humble 89-year-old doesn’t want that label.

“I don’t like it because there is a big misunderstanding,” he said as he spoke to this paper in his Clinton Hill studio in August before Hurricane Irene was set to hit. “It all began long before I was born.”

The WG News + Arts: Greenpoint Film Festival Kicks Off

Did you know that the Little Rascals was set in Greenpoint? It’s one of the screenings for the upcoming Greenpoint Film Festival, the first of what will become an annual affair organ­ized by Woven Spaces, a local nonprofit public arts group. Taking place October 27 ­– 30 at Broadway Stages in Greenpoint, the line-up includes favorites and lesser-known experimental, avant-garde shorts and feature-length films.

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